GST Original Articles

By Brian Tokar / 04 February 2016
It has become a predictable pattern at the annual UN climate conferences for participants to describe the outcome in widely divergent ways. This was first apparent after the high-profile Copenhagen conference in 2009, when a four-page non-agreement was praised by diplomats, but denounced by well-known critics as a “sham,” a “farce,” and a mere face-saver. UN insiders proclaimed the divisive 2013 Warsaw climate conference a success, even though global South delegates and most civil society... Read more
By Jenny McBride / 18 January 2016
The photo of brown bears feeding on a fin whale carcass near Kodiak is stunning: two species of Alaskan charasmatic megafauna we rarely if ever see together. What's more, there are several bears – a group of mother and cubs at each end of the carcass – because the whale is so large that there is plenty of room for these two parties to feed without bothering each other. Between May and August, 2015 a total of 11 fin whales, 14 humpback, and one gray whale (and another four unidentified... Read more
By Staughton Lynd and Andy Piascik / 15 November 2015
A review of Leilah Danielson's American Gandhi: A.J. Muste and the History of Radicalism in the Twentieth Century. A Question American Gandhi: A.J. Muste and the History of Radicalism in the Twentieth Century is the most comprehensive and thoroughly-researched account of the life of A.J. Muste yet to appear. It is particularly valuable in its treatment of the years that Muste devoted to building a radical labor movement, 1919 to 1936.  This review limits itself to that... Read more
By Richard Burke / 14 November 2015
A review by R. Burke of Kate Evans' Red Rosa; A Graphic Biography of Rosa Luxemburg. When the Cold War ended many shortsighted, and ill-informed people thought we had reached the end of history, and that Capitalism had triumphed, Socialism had failed. Today, after the events of the first 15 years of the 21st century, that triumphalism rings hollow. What actually happened was that history had decided in what had long been an argument between various competing versions of Socialism. What were... Read more

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More Reading Recommended by GST

By Elizabeth Kolbert / 13 November 2017
Carbon Engineering, a company owned in part by Bill Gates, has its headquarters on a spit of land that juts into Howe Sound, an hour north of Vancouver. Until recently, the land was a toxic-waste site, and the company’s equipment occupies a long, barnlike building that, for many years, was used to process contaminated water. The offices, inherited from the business that poisoned the site, provide... Read more
By Ish N Mishra / 12 November 2017
The term Dialectical Materialismwas not used by Marx himself but by subsequent Marxists to delineate the synthesis of Marx’s critiques of Hegel’s Dialectics, which he called idealist and Feuerbach’s materialism, which he called mechanical or metaphysical. For the first time the term Dialectical Materialism was used by Plekhanov in 1891.Five years after Marx’s death Engels expressed his and Marx’s... Read more
By Ramzy Baroud / 11 November 2017
To a certain extent, Aung San Suu Kyi is a false prophet. Glorified by the west for many years, she was made a ‘democracy icon’ because she opposed the same forces in her country, Burma,  at the time as the US-led western coalition that was isolating Rangoon for its alliance with China. Aung San Suu Kyi played her role as expected, winning the approval of the Right and the admiration of the Left... Read more
By Shelley Connor / 09 November 2017
The number of people suffering from malnutrition worldwide rose to 815 million in 2016, rising by 38 million from the year before. According to a new report co-signed by five United Nations agencies and charities, and made public by the Food and Agriculture Organisation of the UN (FAOUN) on Friday, this was the first such year-to-year increase since the beginning of the 21st century. The... Read more
By John Bellamy Foster / 03 November 2017
The prevailing liberal approach to ecological problems, including climate change, has long put capital accumulation before people and the planet. It is maintained that through new technologies, demographic shifts (such as population control), and the mechanisms of the global “free market,” the existing system can successfully address the immense ecological challenges before us. In short, the... Read more
By Alan Broughton / 29 October 2017
The term Green Revolution refers to the introduction of high-yielding varieties of staple food crops, particularly wheat and rice, into Third World countries, starting in the 1960s. Initially Mexico, India and the Philippines were targeted. The stated aim was to increase food production to end hunger and prevent uprisings. The Green Revolution did increase agricultural production, and no more... Read more
By JIM CREEGAN / 26 October 2017
The beginning of the American New Left is usually dated from the appearance of the Port Huron Statement in 1962 . Drawn up by a handful of members of Students or a Democratic Society (SDS) at a conference in the Michigan town it is named for, the statement is an expression of the  growing discontent of middle-class students–“raised in modest comfort”, in their words–with the social and political... Read more

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