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Thinking Politically

Stories about Thinking Politically.

An open letter to the people of the U.S.A. from President Nicolás Maduro

By: 
Nicolás Maduro

If I know anything, it is about the people, because just like you, I am a man of the people. I was born and raised in a poor neighborhood of Caracas. I was forged in the heat of popular and union struggles in a Venezuela submerged in exclusion and inequality. I am no tycoon; I am a worker of mind and heart.  Today I have the great privilege of presiding over the new Venezuela, rooted in a model of inclusive development and social equality, which Comandante Hugo Chávez forged starting in 1998, inspired by the legacy of Simón Bolivar.

Popular Democracy in Cuba

By: 
Charles McKelvey

The socialist governments of the Third World plus China have developed popular democracy, with structures that are alternatives to those of representative democracy.  Laws and policies are decided by deputies of the people, and not by politicians dependent on the support of corporate and wealthy interests.  Let us look at the historical development of the alternative political process in the case of Cuba.

Canada's carbon tax battle: Why Liberals and Conservatives can't solve the environmental crisis

By: 
Matt Gardner

The debate over Trudeau’s so-called “carbon tax” is shaping up to be a defining issue in Canada’s 2019 federal election. Since Prime Minister Justin Trudeau joined most of the country’s premiers in 2016 to sign a “pan-Canadian” agreement taxing carbon consumption, an alliance of federal and provincial Conservative leaders have made opposition to the carbon pricing plan a central focus of their campaign against the Liberals. Yet the Conservatives’ rhetoric, which evokes concerns over the tax’s impact on the cost of living, only masks the fact that their own policies amount to nothing but corporate welfare—the chief result of which will be to worsen economic inequality without solving the environmental crisis. The hard truth, unmentionable by bourgeois politicians, is that capitalism is incapable of adequately responding to the threat posed by climate change.

Bases, Bases, Everywhere... Except in the Pentagon’s Report

By: 
Nick Turse

Within hours of President Trump’s announcement of a withdrawal of U.S. forces from Syria, equipment at that base was already being inventoried for removal. And just like that, arguably the most important American garrison in Syria was (maybe) being struck from the Pentagon’s books—except, as it happens, al-Tanf was never actually on the Pentagon’s books.

What Ireland’s Pro-Choice Referendum Teaches Us About Democracy

By: 
Sameer Dossani

When future historians write about 2018, what will stand out? Some might say the midterm elections that repudiated of the policies of Donald Trump and saw the ascendency of some pretty progressive figures – including Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez – who might potentially save our two-party system from the dreaded scourge of centrism.  But to me one of the most important stories of the year is also one of the least understood.

Socialism for Realists

By: 
Sam Gindin

Intuitively, it is a stretch to assert that a social system with a wide range of goals of which the development of the productive forces is only one, will surpass a society consumed by the singularity of that goal. The incentive-egalitarian balance highlights that trade-off. And if we accept that the path to socialism will involve sacrifices and choices all along the way, including in its construction, then winning people to the socialist cause and keeping them there will have to be based on their desire for something different rather than the questionable promise of socialism bringing not only more justice, more democracy, more workplace control, but also more growth.

The State of Social Movements in Latin America: An Interview with Raúl Zibechi

By: 
Jeff Abbot

A very comprehensive overview of the current state of social movements in the region, with a focus on extractivism, indigenous peoples, the role of youth and women, responses to the right, etc.

The Bolton Speech on Africa: A Case of the Wolf and the Foxes

By: 
Ajamu Baraka

Malcolm X reminded us that we had to be careful about the difference between the wolf and the fox. The wolf for black people was the hardcore, racist white folks with the hoods and clearly articulated stance in support of white supremacy. The fox, on the other hand, was the liberals who were supposed to be our friends. Their ultimate support for white supremacy was always just as deadly but sugarcoated in diversionary language like “humanitarian intervention” and the “responsibility to protect.” The game, according to Malcolm, was that black folks would recognize danger of the wolf and run from the wolf straight into the jaws of the fox with the consequence being just as fatal because both the fox and the wolf are members of the same canine family.

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